Conference Schedule & Sessions

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THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2020
4:00–10:00 pm Board Game Meetup at Shooters 2.0
 
FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2020
8:30–8:45 am Welcome & Land Acknowledgement
8:45–9:30 am Opening Keynote with James Riggall
9:45–10:45 am Lightning Talks: Deep Roots Encouraging Growth in Technical Services: Implementing a Learning Environment for Decision-Making

Guerrilla Grafting: Going Out on a Limb for Library Instruction

Lifelong Learning: The Academic Library Beyond Higher Education

11:15 am–12:15 pm Cultivating Use of OER Through Course-Specific Collections Five Years on the Job: A Faculty Librarian’s Reflection on Embracing Diversity, Promoting Inclusivity & Cultivating Community  Gaming for Social Good: Collecting and Playing Games in an Academic Library

Cultivating Community: Articulating Your Library’s Value Through Outreach

12:15–1:45 pm Lunch on Own
1:45–2:45 pm Using a Discovery Tool in Library Instruction to Increase Research Motivation of First-Generation Students Lighting Talks: New Growth Student Needs Are Academic Needs: Grafting Library Strengths into the Tree of Student Success Fertile Soil: Cultivating an Online Information Literacy Community Garden
3:15–4:15 pm Creating Peer Connections for Transfer Students at the Library Deep Engagement, New Model: Applying Universal Design Principles in a Studio Setting AskWA Statewide Virtual Reference Cooperative: Migration from QP to SpringShare  Growing as Educators in a Community of Practice
4:30–5:00 pm
Closing Keynote with Lauren Pressley
6:00–8:00 pm Dine Around Ellensburg

 


 

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2020

4:00–10:00 pm

Board Game Meetup at Shooters 2.0

Coming over the night before the conference? Join us in a little “before-party” (far cooler than an after-party) at Shooters 2.0 as we mix and mingle over food, drinks, and games with other academic library staff from around the state. Make new friends playing Mario 64 (and then lose them when you use the blue shell), or hang out and play some pool or any of a variety of board games.


FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2020

8:45–9:30 am

Imagined Realities: Virtual Reality & the Future of Libraries
Opening Keynote with James Riggall

Virtual and augmented reality are evolving fast. What does that mean for the libraries of the future? Hear from technology educator James Riggall about his experience in starting the Extended Reality (XR) Lab in the Bellevue College Library and eLearning Center.

James Riggall is a Tasmanian entrepreneur and technology educator. He has developed innovative programs to support STEM/STEM education and entrepreneurship, including as founder of Bitlink, a technology consultancy and software development house that helps local businesses build their own success in the digital economy; teacher at the Human Interface Technology Laboratory (HITLab); a director of Startup Tasmania; key proponent of the Macquarie House Project coworking space; a founder of Enterprize, a not-for-profit that runs coworking spaces in Tasmania for early stage startups; and a founder of the Battery Shed, a collaborative hackerspace attached to the Queen Victoria Museum & Art Gallery. In 2017, James was awarded a prestigious Fulbright Scholarship to travel to become a visiting scholar at Bellevue College, where he worked with Bellevue staff to help build momentum around technology and business education. At Bellevue College, James developed and ran a highly successful course that studied virtual/augmented reality from a humanities perspective, as well as a mini-accelerator program as an internship for students at Tesla STEM High School in Redmond. James has continued working with Bellevue College in recent years, including leading the establishment of an XR Lab on campus, which is based in the Bellevue College Library and eLearning Center.


9:45–10:45 am

Lightning Talks: Deep Roots
In ever-changing library ecosystems, learn how to stay grounded in your library’s mission and community. Hear lightning-fast presentations from academic libraries that cultivating these deep roots. Learn how a university teaches basic science information literacy to non-science majors to create inclusive learning environments. See how a technical college practices the 4 Connections, a simple framework for intentionally building relationships to empower creativity and critical thinking and to decrease equity gaps in course success. Hear about how a required first-year university course uses scaffolded library research assignments to develop skills in topic formation, thesis development, source selection, and citation skills. Learn how an experiential group training can build communication and conflict resolution skills on campus through a community of belonging. Discover how a library builds relationships with graduate students through a writing workshop series, and how you can create collaborative workshops at your own institution.

David Luftig, Science Librarian, Washington State University
Sally Heilstedt, Dean of Instruction, Lake Washington Institute of Technology
Corey Johnson, Instruction and Assessment Librarian, Washington State University Libraries
Sue Wozniak, Faculty Librarian, Lake Washington Institute of Technology
Lorena O'English, Social Sciences and Government Information Librarian, Washington State University Libraries

Encouraging Growth in Technical Services: Implementing a Learning Environment for Decision-Making
Sweeping innovations in publishing models, shifts from print to electronic, and the impact of consortia have transformed academic library technical services operations. Work is transitioning from assignment of routine work to a dynamic and shifting project-based operation where both staff and management input is crucial to success. The new environment requires all staff to engage in decision-making, using evaluation, synthesis, and prioritization to meet project and operational goals. This presentation highlights activities from a university library’s collection services unit implemented to lay the groundwork for a more collaborative and empowered team of paraprofessional and professional staff able to anticipate and adapt to the rapidly evolving library environment. Following the presentation, panelists will facilitate an interactive activity, focused on identifying potential engagement opportunities at attendees’ institutions.

Rose Sliger Krause, Assistant Professor and Metadata Librarian, Eastern Washington University
Merri Hartse, Assistant Professor and Discovery Services & Systems Librarian, Eastern Washington University

Guerrilla Grafting: Going Out on a Limb for Library Instruction
Taking the guerrilla grafting metaphor of creating fruit-bearing branches on urban trees, this interactive session asks us to bring our existing library instruction tools and cross-pollinate them with new and different practices. How can we get new growth in our library instruction sessions? Using a hybrid approach of three fast-paced instruction challenges and design thinking, this session will have attendees rolling up their sleeves to generate new ideas and possibilities in a collaborative environment.

Heath Ray Hayden, Interim Dean, Library & eLearning, Bellevue College

Lifelong Learning: The Academic Library Beyond Higher Education
Learn how a technical college library strives to support diverse learners who may or may not be currently enrolled college students. Hear about the relationship between the library and its surrounding community, and see concrete examples of work that is being done to promote lifelong learning through the college and its community partnerships, including a recent partnership with a public library system. We will discuss the culture of libraries that transcends categorization and isolation, with additional consideration of current Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) work at the college.

Greg Bem, Faculty Librarian, Lake Washington Institute of Technology


11:15 am–12:15 pm

Cultivating Use of OER Through Course-Specific Collections
Hear from leaders in the curation of openly licensed materials and support for faculty developing fully OER courses. Team members will share examples of course-specific collections, focusing on how collections align with course outcomes and where they are housed. Course-specific collections not only aid development of fully OER courses but also make OER more easily accessible, adoptable, and adaptable for our faculty colleagues. Participants will have ample time to consider how to implement similar work on their campuses and will be guided through multiple approaches for doing so. One approach will be workshopped during the session.

Sally Heilstedt, Dean of Instruction, Lake Washington Institute of Technology
Katherine Kelley, Faculty Librarian, Lake Washington Institute of Technology

Five Years on the Job: A Faculty Librarian’s Reflection on Embracing Diversity, Promoting Inclusivity & Cultivating Community
By promoting diversity and accessibility, academic libraries contribute to their institutions’ mission of creating inclusive communities. Tracing the course of a five-year career as a Diversity & Inclusion Librarian, the presenter shares her experiences utilizing library resources to engage students of diverse backgrounds, build collaborative partnerships outside the library, and promote campus inclusion efforts. This presentation also provides insight on the relatively new diversity and inclusion librarianship, identifying its fundamental roles and activities and offering strategies for overcoming challenges and barriers.

Qing Stellwagen, Diversity and Inclusion Librarian/Assistant Professor, Eastern Washington University Libraries

Gaming for Social Good: Collecting and Playing Games in an Academic Library
Want to build a board game collection but don't know where to start? Perplexed by how to circulate them once you have them? Curious what kinds of events students might be interested in? Want to learn more about how games can tackle complex social issues in ways that few other media can? This session will address these questions and more. Participants will have time to look at and handle games, both familiar and new, that are taking on some of the challenging themes and issues of our day.

Ahniwa Ferrari, Associate Dean of Library Operations, The Evergreen State College

Cultivating Community: Articulating Your Library’s Value Through Outreach
As academic libraries seek to help our communities flourish, outreach is more important than ever. Library workers employ time-tested and innovative strategies for sharing the value and impact of library resources, services, and spaces. In this session, a panel of librarians from Central Washington University, University of Washington, Bellevue College, and Olympic College will share outreach programs that have proven effective in engaging students, faculty, staff and community members. Through programming, marketing, strategic partnerships, unique collaborations, class visits, and embedded instruction, these librarians are growing engagement and helping patrons reach their full potential.

Emilie Vrbancic, Undergraduate Experience Librarian, University of Washington
Lauren Wittek, User Experience and Assessment Librarian, Central Washington University
Maureen Rust, Student Engagement and Community Outreach Librarian, Central Washington University
Elena Maans, Outreach Librarian, Bellevue College
Heather Newcomer, Faculty Librarian, Lead of Engagement and Outreach Team, Olympic College


1:45–2:45 pm

Using a Discovery Tool in Library Instruction to Increase Research Motivation of First-Generation Students
At Eastern Washington University, nearly half of freshmen are first-generation students. Often less prepared for college, these students show excessive anxiety when faced with rigorous curricular demands, including the need to locate, evaluate, and use a variety of information sources. This presentation focuses on a project to improve the quality of library services for this at-risk student population. The project examined the effectiveness of using a discovery tool, Primo, as a solution to the challenge of designing instructional products that fit the needs and information-seeking preferences of first-generation students. Data collected suggest that Primo aligns well with the way first-generation students approach information discovery, and has a positive impact on increasing their readiness to conduct independent research.

Liya Deng, Social Sciences Librarian, Eastern Washington University
Merri Hartse, Discovery Services & Systems Librarian, Eastern Washington University

Lightning Talks: New Growth
How do libraries remain responsive to emerging ways of accessing information and a changing student population, and rise to meet the future needs of teaching and learning? Hear lightning-fast presentations from innovators who are cultivating new growth in academic library work. Hear how one university library collaborated on usability research and website redesign workflows. Learn about opportunities and changes within AskWA, the cooperative of more than fifty public and academic libraries throughout the state, which provides 24/7 online reference services for every participating library. Discover methods to organize and track funding opportunities for your library through a shared database that empowers faculty and staff to seek grant opportunities for their own visionary projects. By adding Universal Design for Learning elements to LibGuides, build a framework to address common student barriers by providing multiple means for engagement, representation, action, and expression. Learn how libraries could destroy Facebook by working cooperatively to scale and connect decentralized networks, and build a social media platform that could take over the world.

Blake Galbreath, Core Services Librarian, Washington State University Libraries
Erica England, First-Year Experience Librarian, Washington State University Libraries
Sara Peté, AskWA Coordinator, Washington State Library
Julie Carmen, Research Librarian, Central Washington University
Ben Rearick, Web Services and Usability Librarian, Washington State University Libraries
Ahniwa Ferrari, Associate Dean of Library Operations, The Evergreen State College

Student Needs Are Academic Needs: Grafting Library Strengths into the Tree of Student Success
Students face large non-curricular barriers to success. A recent IMLS grant project surveyed students at seven schools across the US to identify the scope of need in areas such as borrowing technology devices, accessing child care, connecting with a social worker, etc. Students identified campus libraries as a place they would seek these support services. This presentation will discuss national and Pierce College-specific data, along with pilot projects that address equity in student success. Attendees will discover services that could assist students at their own institutions, consider potential partnerships with other campus departments, and envision ways to leverage time and funding.

Laurie Shuster, Reference and Instruction Librarian, Pierce College
Nateisha Allen, Reference and Instruction Librarian, Pierce College
Jennifer Sundheim, Reference and Instruction Librarian, Pierce College

Fertile Soil: Cultivating an Online Information Literacy Community Garden
Librarians across five Washington State community colleges have been planting the seeds of online information literacy (IL) modules as part of a two-year Assessment in Action (AiA) grant. This work focused on identifying best practices in IL module creation and breaking down silos to reduce duplication of online IL materials. Research results indicate online and face-to-face IL instruction is equally effective, and implementing common practices rooted in instructional design will improve the effectiveness of online IL materials. This session will start with a lay-of-the-land and work completed, followed by breakout sessions centered on how we can broaden this work to the larger community.

Deborah Moore, Reference Librarian, Highline College
Heath Ray Hayden, Interim Dean, Library and eLearning, Bellevue College
Caroline Conley, Librarian, North Seattle College


2:30–3:30 pm

Creating Peer Connections for Transfer Students at the Library
Transfer students must adjust to a new university environment, and may struggle with age differences, feelings of not belonging, and lack of connections. Peer-mentoring programs are an effective method of helping transfer students build connections around academics and campus resources, improve organization and time management skills, and create a network of peer support. Presenters will discuss their experience developing and implementing a peer mentoring program for transfer students in the library. The graduate students who helped run the program will also provide insight on the learning curve to being an effective facilitator, challenges, and outcomes for students.

Elizabeth Brown, Instruction Coordinator, Central Washington University
Lianna Johnson, Graduate Assistant, Central Washington University
Jasmin Moreno Sanchez, Graduate Assistant, Central Washington University

Deep Engagement, New Model: Applying Universal Design Principles in a Studio Setting
In celebration of a student population that is 50% ethnic minority and 43% first-generation, librarians at Seattle Pacific University have re-aligned services to bring optimum success to this changing population. In collaboration with the campus Writing Program, and inspired by another institution in the region, the SPU Library has opened the Research, Reading & Writing Studio. The Studio visitor enters into a seamless process of assistance from tutors and librarians, one that applies the Universal Design for Learning principle of “multiple means of engagement.” Session participants will gain innovative tools for implementing a Studio model at their own institutions.

Janet Hauck, Business and Social Sciences Librarian, Seattle Pacific University
Peter Moe, Director of Campus Writing, Seattle Pacific University
Liz Gruchala-Gilbert, College of Arts & Sciences Librarian, Seattle Pacific University
Carrie Fry, Sciences Librarian, Seattle Pacific University

AskWA Statewide Virtual Reference Cooperative: Migration from QP to SpringShare
Learn about the new software coming to AskWA, the cooperative of more than fifty public and academic libraries throughout the state, which provides 24/7 online reference services for every participating library. SpringShare has purchased QuestionPoint, and AskWA will be migrating to new LibAnswers/LibChat software (expected to happen in Spring of 2020). Preview the new software and discuss what these changes mean for AskWA participants. A staff member from Springshare will also be present to answer audience questions about the migration and software. This will also be a great opportunity to connect in person with other virtual reference librarians and share knowledge across institutions.

Sara Peté, AskWA Coordinator, Washington State Library

Growing as Educators in a Community of Practice
How do you find opportunities to grow professionally as an adjunct librarian? As a full-time librarian, how do you support your peers when professional development opportunities are more readily available but the opportunity to share is not? Learn about how one college formed a Community of Practice to address those challenges. In this session, you will learn how and why the CoP was formed, how Faculty Education Workshops are used, and why it is important to "recast the narrative" of a top-down culture. There will be a discussion about ways library workers can support each other professionally and personally as they grow as educators.

Kiki Tommila, Faculty Librarian, Whatcom Community College


4:30–5:00 pm

The Library Is a Growing Organism
Closing Keynote with Lauren Pressley

Libraries remain grounded in traditional values and services, while evolving to serve new and emerging needs in our information environments and communities. This presentation will explore how libraries, and those that work in them, grow and adapt while remaining true to the foundations of our work.

Lauren Pressley is the Associate Dean for Research and Learning Services at the University of Washington Libraries and the Past President (2018-2019) of the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL). Formerly, Lauren was an Associate Dean of the University of Washington Libraries, Director of the UW Tacoma campus library, and Director of Learning Environments for Virginia Tech University Libraries. Lauren has been recognized with the Bea Kovacs Outstanding Alumni Award from the UNC-Greensboro Library and Information Studies Program, with a Distinguished Alumni Early Career Award from the UNC-Greensboro School of Education, as a Library Journal Mover and Shaker, and as an ALA Emerging Leader.


6:00–8:00 pm

Dine Around Ellensburg

All are invited to attend the post-conference dine-around! Are you interested in meeting library colleagues for a conversation over food and drink? Consider the dine-around event following the conference program. A dine-around is a pay-your-own meal event to encourage socializing, networking, and discussion. Participants sign-up in advance and join a group to a specific restaurant. Each group is represented by specific Washington State fauna, and contains a volunteer “lead” who will be responsible for rallying the group and leading discussion.

The conference dine-around will be immediately after the conference (Friday 3/20/20 from 6pm-8pm). Please meet at registration desk to depart for the restaurant with your group.