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2020 WLA Conference Sessions

Click the buttons below to jump to each conference day. When our conference app goes live, you can search and filter sessions to build your own agenda. 

Monday
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Monday, October 5 | 11:15–12:30 | Sessions I

Booktalking the Best with CAYAS!
Wondering what's new in children’s and young adult literature? Join WLA’s Children and Young Adult Services (CAYAS) Section and MLIS students for a booktalking presentation full of recently published titles for children, tweens, and teens. We will highlight stories from the perspectives of #OwnVoices authors of picture books, chapter books, and graphic novels. The 20+ previewed books will focus on those published within the past three years and will also include those yet to be published—you heard it here first!

Kat Wyly, MLIS candidate/iSchool liaison to CAYAS, University of Washington iSchool
Charlotte McGrew, MLIS candidate/iSchool liaison to CAYAS, University of Washington iSchool
Addy Ascencio, MLIS Candidate, University of Washington iSchool
Bethany Barelman, MLIS Candidate, University of Washington iSchool

Sponsor: CAYAS
 

It IS All Fun & Games: Create Game Collections & Events in the Academic Library
From board games to card games to video games to party games, learn about some of the collections and events that are taking place at two academic libraries. We'll provide collections and events tips and answer questions about how attendees can get started with their own games programming.

Ahniwa Ferrari, Associate Dean of Library Operations, The Evergreen State College
Stefanie Gorzelsky, Access Services Librarian, Saint Martin's University
Jackie Nordquist, Collections Librarian, Saint Martin's University

So You've Become a Leader at Your Library
As the landscape of libraries change, the approach to leadership needs to change with it. New library leaders are often not equipped to transition into their role of leadership. This causes turmoil, confusion, frustration, and feelings of being an imposter for the new leader. This presentation addresses how to better prepare for your new leadership role by exploring the importance of creating relationships, cascading communication channels, understanding financial and institutional history, and developing a leadership style.

Gavin Woltjer, Director, Billings Public Library

A Practical Plan for Measurable Outcomes
What makes an outcome statement an effective measurement tool? Who should develop outcomes for an organization? How do you measure outcomes related to the collection, or technology, or library space use? Hear from an analyst who has been answering these questions and more for several years, and discover meaningful connections between your own services and outcomes. Leave with tools, tips, advice, and some down-to-earth, brass tacks methods for measuring outcomes in your organization.

Sam Wallin, Analyst / Project Coordinator, Fort Vancouver Regional Library

Monday, October 5 | 1:30–2:15 | Sessions II

Booktalking Books You've Never Read (And May Never Read)
IN A WORLD… where publishers put out far more material than any human has time to read, the skills of recommending books to others have to adapt. The idea of talking about a book you haven't read may induce terror, but fear not! There are ways of understanding a book without having had to have read it. Hear secrets from a mid-career librarian, and bring a book you've never read for practice!

Alex Byrne, Youth Services Librarian, Pierce County Library System

Listening to Families: Learning What Caregivers Want from One-Time Summer Programming 
Are you looking for innovative ways to offer family-centered, community-responsive programming at your library? Here’s what parents and caregivers want you to know! In this session, we’ll share concrete suggestions directly from a diverse group of caregivers in King County about how they access summer learning at libraries and what they value in programming for their children. We’ll show how STEM programming can be one tool for engaging children, while also meeting the needs of families and building upon the skills caregivers are already teaching their children at home.

Lindsey Childers, STEM Program Developer, foundry10
Kat Chen, Research Coordinator, foundry10

Have a CCOW: A CRAAP Alternative for the Internet Age
The popular CRAAP Test for evaluating information sources has recently come under criticism for being unequal to the internet age. However, while CRAAP's simplicity and ease of understanding make it suitable for teaching in a typical one-shot library instruction session, many suggested alternatives complicate the picture with difficult acronyms or involved processes. CCOW is a simplified evaluation technique which seeks to retain the ease and memorability of CRAAP while encouraging an investigative mindset. It also prompts self-evaluation and metacognition, which are critical for evaluating information. This session will present the CCOW criteria in the form of a flipped online guide and exercise which has been successfully used to teach information literacy to college freshmen.

Anthony Tardiff, Instruction & First Year Engagement Librarian, Gonzaga University

Staying Non-Partisan Doesn't Mean Staying Quiet
As our national political conversation becomes increasingly divided, it's easy to want to avoid politics altogether, but talking about laws, politicians, and our political process is a vital part of a thriving and thinking democracy. Libraries can support political inquiry and civil discourse by reaching into our traditional skill sets of inquiry, listening, and authoritative research. Yet there are times when toxic, political talk goes too far and threatens to make our libraries unsafe for some of our patrons. Librarians must be the firm voices that keep our spaces safe and welcoming to all people, balancing freedom of expression with inclusion. This session will be a chance to learn and share the skills, attitudes, and phrasings that will make libraries islands of democratic, civil discussion as Election Day 2020 approaches.

Erin Suda, Public Services Assistant, Whatcom County Library System, Deming branch
Dianne Marrs-Smith, Public Services Branch Manager, Whatcom County Library System, Lynden branch

Monday, October 5 | 3:30–4:15 | After School Sessions

After School Sessions are hyper-focused on school librarians and scheduled after they wrap up the school day. School-relevant programs are still scheduled throughout the conference.

Diversity Tagging: Becoming More Aware of Your Collection! 
Diversity Tagging into Destiny—take a deeper look at your collection as a whole and its diversity throughout. Discover more about what your books offer to your students—are they windows, sliding doors, or mirrors? Get a glimpse into the early stages of working as a district to discover and decipher the diversity within our libraries!

Jamie Moffett, Librarian, Clover Park School District
Mary Moser, Librarian, Clover Park School District

OSPI K–12 Washington Hub on OER Commons: Use, Adapt & Share Free Digital Materials 
Explore the Washington OER Hub, an online repository of standards-aligned, quality open educational resources. Learn how to navigate the platform, search for materials, download and remix content. We’ll highlight exemplar instructional materials developed by Washington districts, focusing on those resources best suited for remote learning environments. Additionally, OSPI content experts have curated a selection of links to external organizations providing free online educational materialscourses, lessons, videos, and simulationsparticularly useful as many schools explore hybrid learning options.

Barbara Soots, Open Educational Resources and Instructional Materials Program Manager, Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction


Tuesday, October 6 | 11:15–12:30 | Sessions I

WLA 2020: WA Do I Read Next?
Come enjoy a lively review of new and fabulous books written by Washington State authors. A panel of readers’ advisory librarians will present brief and enticing booktalks for fiction and nonfiction titles you’ll want to share with your patrons. This session is ideal for readers’ advisors, collection staff, and everyone who works in a library and loves books. Let’s support and celebrate the rich literary landscape of Washington! Booktalks will cover adult and youth books.

Misha Stone, Reader Services Librarian, The Seattle Public Library
Sheri Boggs, Youth Collection Development Librarian, Spokane County Library District
Jasmine Silvera, Author

Peer Support for Peer Support: Building a Library Peer Research Consultation Program
A Student Peer Research Consultant (SPRC) program can help libraries to extend their reach and empower students to succeed. In this presentation, we will discuss how we leveraged existing peer support models to launch our SPRC program. We will discuss our process, learning outcomes, and lessons learned, such as the advantages of using task forces to plan, develop partnerships, create program outcomes, and deliver training to new SPRCs in a span of six months. Perhaps most importantly, we will cover what to do not only when things don’t go well, but how to respond to the twists and turns of a global pandemic!

Christopher Granatino, Director, Research Services, Seattle University
Billie Boyd, Temporary Assistant Librarian, Seattle University
Caitlin Plovnick, Coordinator, Teaching and Learning, Seattle University

How to Wingardium Leviosa Your Community into the Library [11:15–12:00]
Wondering how to get your community to think like Hermione and “Go to the Library?” Fandom is an ever-popular enticement to get all ages using libraries, but you don’t have to do it alone. Whether it's fantasy, science fiction, or comics, library users love to celebrate their favorite stories together as a community. Using specific examples of how to engage young children, teens, and adults, this program will demonstrate the ways you can engage passionate fans without breaking the bank. Learn how one public library leveraged local art connections, teacher enthusiasm, and eager volunteers to create lasting partnerships with civic leaders, community organizations, and more. Librarianship shouldn’t be a solo endeavor, and fandom is the perfect conductor to building new partnerships in your community and strengthening existing ones. Show your community the library’s relevance, introduce them to new services, and let volunteers help you avoid burnout.

Diana Farnsworth, Librarian, Anacortes Public Library

Toward a Vision of Health: Public Libraries as Partners in Health
Libraries have historically played a central role in supporting myriad literacy initiatives but may hesitate when it comes to promoting and providing health literacy services. In this session, we’ll explore the connection between health literacy and health equity, learn about a free program from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine to support public libraries’ capacity to offer health literacy programs, and then hear from staff from two Washington public libraries. Each will share why and how they decided to address specific health literacy needs within their community through creative outreach projects that incorporated relevant programming, services, and technology. They’ll also share the impact of COVID-19 on their projects as well as any outcomes-to-date and their library’s future plans for addressing health literacy. Ready to move toward a vision of health in your community? This session can help.

Michele Spatz, Community Engagement Coordinator, NNLM PNR
Aileen Luppert, Managing Librarian, Spokane Valley Branch, Spokane County Library District
Sarah A. O’Hare, Public Services Specialist, Spokane Valley Branch, Spokane County Library District
Amy Hille, Library Assistant, East Adams Library District

Tuesday, October 6 | 1:30–2:15 | Sessions II

Teaching about the Holocaust through Literature
Since the recent Washington legislation "strongly encouraging" teaching about the Holocaust and adhering to new best practices and guidelines for this education, teachers, schools and districts need guidance concerning appropriate literature in ELA classes. In this discussion-based seminar, participants will consider and discuss the merits of fiction and nonfiction for this education, graphic novels, grade-level appropriateness of relevant books, and the importance of historical accuracy in literature connected with lessons and units pertaining to the Holocaust. With our increasingly diverse student populations, Holocaust literature and lessons resonate profoundly, creating both mirrors and windows for all readers.

Paul Regelbrugge, Professional Development and Curriculum Coordinator, Holocaust Center for Humanity

Equipping Our Future with the Adulting 101 Series EQ
After identifying a lack of programming available for the target audience of high school students and recent graduates, a partnership was formed between our county 4-H Program and our public library. The result was "Adulting 101," a 6-week program for high school students and young adults. Participants develop skills that build resilience as well as a network of resources as they hear from local experts on topics such as Financial Health, Healthy Relationships, Healthy Lifestyles, Civic Engagement, and more. Learn about this model of partnership and the short-term program design that created “Adulting 101”!

Susan Kerwin, Sr. Branch Supervisor, Fort Vancouver Regional Library
Abby Brandt, 4H Program Manager, Klickitat County/WSU Extension

Critical for Success: Engaging Technical Services Staff in Decision-Making
Sweeping innovations in publishing models, shifts from print to electronic, and the impact of consortia have transformed library technical services operations. Work is transitioning from assignment of routine tasks to a dynamic and shifting project-based operation where both staff and management input is crucial to success. The new environment requires all staff to engage in decision-making, using evaluation, synthesis, and prioritization to meet project and operational goals. From physical space redesign to development of shared ground rules, this presentation highlights innovative activities implemented to lay the foundation for a more collaborative and empowered team of paraprofessional and professional staff ready to anticipate and adapt to the rapidly evolving library landscape. Following the presentation, panelists will facilitate an interactive activity focused on identifying potential engagement opportunities at attendees’ libraries.

Rose Sliger Krause, Metadata Librarian, Eastern Washington University Libraries
Merri Hartse, Discovery Services & Systems Librarian, Eastern Washington University Libraries

Libraries Open Pathways to Civil Legal Justice
People instinctively turn to the library to find help with crises in their lives. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has amplified a host of civil legal issues, such as housing, employment, divorce, custody, or debt management. Too many people don’t know where to turn and can’t afford to start with a lawyer. Your library plays a vital role in connecting community members with relevant information to help them navigate the complexities of the civil legal system. Learn about Washington state resources and how to walk the fine line between information and advice. You can turn people’s lives around.

Betha Gutsche, WebJunction Programs Manager, OCLC

Tuesday, October 6 | 2:30–3:00 | Coffee Chats

Public Library Division Unconference
Join your colleagues for this open and unstructured discussion of topics relevant to the important work that public libraries do, and where it’s heading in the future. With a main facilitator helping to guide the process, session content will be decided on and delivered by the attendees. Join us to share your ideas, to participate in the conversation, or simply to absorb peer wisdom!

Sam Wallin, Sam Wallin, Public Library Division Chair
Carol Ellison, Public Library Division Vice Chair/Chair-Elect

Academic Library Division Unconference
Join your colleagues for this open and unstructured discussion of topics relevant to the important work that academic libraries do, and where it’s heading in the future. With a main facilitator helping to guide the process, session content will be decided on and delivered by the attendees. Join us to share your ideas, to participate in the conversation, or simply to absorb peer wisdom!

Ahniwa Ferrari, Board Director, Academic Library Division

BIPOC Meetup
Connect with other BIPOC library professionals and advocates for open networking and discussion. 
To prioritize space for groups that are underrepresented in our profession, this meetup is open to those who identify as people of color and/or Indigenous.

Tuesday, October 6 | 3:30–4:45 | After School Sessions

After School Sessions are hyper-focused on school librarians and scheduled after they wrap up the school day. School-relevant programs are still scheduled throughout the conference.

School Library Division Unconference
Join your colleagues for this open and unstructured discussion of topics relevant to the important work that school libraries do, and where it’s heading in the future. With a main facilitator helping to guide the process, session content will be decided on and delivered by the attendees. Join us to share your ideas, to participate in the conversation, or simply to absorb peer wisdom!

Hillary Marshall, School Library Division Chair
Sam Harris, School Library Division Vice Chair/Chair-Elect
Sarah Logan, School Library Division 2021 Vice Chair/Chair-Elect

Follett Destiny Library Manager 18.0
Attendees of this presentation will gain a deeper understanding of the latest features in Destiny Library Manager, which is used by over 90% of the school districts in Washington State. Version 18.0 of Destiny Library Manager will be released in the summer of 2020 and will include updates and enhancements to the Destiny Discover search interface, which supports easy discovery and access for your print and digital content. Designed for use by teachers as well as students and librarians, Destiny Discover allows access to WebPath Express and One Search resources, as well as publisher-hosted content. We’ll also cover Collections by Destiny, the new curation tool that’s built into Destiny Discover.

Brian Hanser, Consultant, Follett School Solutions


Wednesday, October 7 | 10:30–11:00 | Coffee Chats

Emergency Preparedness Discussion
Join an open discussion around emergency preparedness in libraries. Connect with new people, network with professionals from other systems, and share what you learned during the day.

Student Meetup
Connect with your student colleagues for unstructured networking time.

Pearl McCrea, Acquisitions Specialist, University of Washington Gallagher Law Library

EDI Discussion
Join an open discussion around equity, diversity, and inclusion in libraries. Connect with new people, network with professionals from other systems, and share what you learned during the day.


Wednesday, October 7 | 11:15–12:30 | Sessions I

Around the World in 75 Minutes: International Books for Young People
International books differ from books that originate in the US, both in the stories they tell and in the manner of the telling. Stories from other countries support intercultural understanding, build empathy, and expand young people's horizons. Kids who read the world know it, and their place in it, better. Two librarians will explore international literature for young people, considering their diversity, offering ideas about building them into existing models of programming and service, and sharing a few dozen recent favorites.

Thom Barthelmess, Youth Services Manager, Whatcom County Library System - Deming Branch
Sheri Boggs, Youth Collection Development Librarian, Spokane County Library District

Connecting Libraries with Local Teen Book Authors & Illustrators
Enjoy fast and furious presentations (think speed dating meets TED Talks) from local authors and illustrators of books for teens and tweens, then mingle with the presenters during an informal meet-and-greet and signing. Find new books for your libraries, hear secret stories-behind-the-stories to spice up your book talks, check out presenters for potential school visits, gather new ideas for activities, get your questions answered, and pick up some swag. There will be one panel for Teens and Tweens and one for Young Readers pPresented by the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators of Western Washington (SCBWI-WWA) and SCBWI-INW.

Trace Kerr, author, The Names We Take
Kelly Milner Halls, author, Girl Meets Boy
Heidi Lang, author, A Hint of Hydra
Dan Richards, author, Stu Truly
J Anderson Coates, author, Spindle and Dagger
Sara Nickerson, author, Last Meeting of the Gorilla Club
Annette Bay Pimentel, author, All the Way to the Top: How One Girl's Fight for Americans with Disabilities Changed Everything
Mary Cronk Farrell, author, Standing Up Against Hate: How Black Women in the Army Helped Change the Course of WWII
Sarah Kapit, author, Get a Grip, Vivy Cohen!
Ray Stoeve, author, Between Perfect and Real

Creating New Visions for Multimedia Spaces: Providing Access to Tools, Opportunity & Transformation with University Students
In this session, three speakers will present on projects that connect university students with audio/visual technology, in and outside of university libraries. These efforts support students’ innovative use of digital technology so that they may learn about media and tools, expand scholarship, engage with issues of equity and justice, and create social change. Attendees will learn how the speakers designed spaces and created custom training for audio recording based on the needs of their users. Speakers will provide examples of engaging with audiences, and how they have utilized existing resources and projects to support training.

Lotus Norton-Wisla, Digital and Community Outreach Archivist, Washington State University Libraries Center for Digital Scholarship and Curation
Dr. Edmundo Aguilar, Professor, Eastern Washington University
Jason Anderson, Information Technology Customer Support, Washington State University Libraries

Trans 101: Using Inclusive Language to Welcome Transgender Customers
This session offers an introductory look at the lives and experiences of transgender people. We will differentiate between sex, gender identity, gender expression, and sexual orientation; debunk common myths about transgender people; and examine barriers to library services that transgender people may regularly experience. We’ll look at areas of customer service that can be improved for transgender patrons, including practical tips on using non-gendered language. This session is intended for customer service staff, but may be useful to anyone looking to better engage with their LGBTQ+ community. There will be a Q&A following the presentation.

Cail Mangum, Public Services Associate, Spokane County Library District
Caitlin Wheeler, Library Supervisor, Moran Prairie Library, Spokane County Library District

Wednesday, October 7 | 1:30–2:15 | Sessions II

360° Stories: Capturing the Past & Present for the Future
Immersive Storytelling is a creative evolution aiming to preserve the human experience. Using the latest consumer 360° HD cameras, important stories of every kind are being captured for viewing in the ultimate format –Virtual Reality. The Washington State Library, endeavoring to safeguard local culture and history, developed the VR in Libraries: 360° Stories Project that offers a kit with everything needed, including training, to produce a quality immersive video. Come learn about the project, get a sense of the equipment included in the kit, and find out how your library can create its own 360° Story.

Joe Olayvar, IT Consultant, Washington State Library
John MacLeod, Director, XRLibraries
Piera Von Glahn, Principal, Blue Trot Group

Successful Bite-Sized Professional Development on a Budget
"10 Things" is modeled on the "23 Things" project developed in 2006 by the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library. The focus of the original project was to introduce library staff to new Web 2.0 technologies and encourage positive staff response to technological change. Our library’s "10 Things" borrows the idea of short, bite-sized professional development topics paired with experiential learning techniques. Staff participation is optional, but in 2019 over 80% of our staff participated and nearly 50% completed all “10 Things” – and asked for the program to continue in 2020. Leave with ideas to keep your library’s staff engaged and learning in environments with limited time and resources for training.

Tamara Meredith, Director, Jefferson County Library

Become a Neighborhood Champion on Small Business Saturday
Learn how your library can become a Neighborhood Champion on Small Business Saturday, now its 11th year of supporting small businesses and promoting the shop small movement. A Neighborhood Champion is like a cheerleader for local businesses, helping to spread the word and rally the neighborhood. It also involves organizing a community event that helps unite shoppers and small businesses. In this session, learn how to sign up, organize a Small Business Saturday event, plan activities, and connect with local businesses.

Crystal Miller, Business and Career Development Librarian, Spokane County Library District
Danielle Milton, Business and Career Development Librarian, Spokane County Library District
Ree West, Business and Career Development Librarian, Spokane County Library District
Stacey Goddard, Public Services Manager, Spokane County Library District

Books & Libations: Partnering with Local Vendors to Offer Book Tastings
Learn how one library system has partnered with volunteers and local vendors to offer nine renditions of Books & Libations, a program in which participants sample a wine (or tea, or coffee, or cupcake) and hear a book talk for a title that has been “paired” with the treat. Community demand for this program quickly overtook the 50 registration spots the program could accommodate; in 2019, the structure was revamped to serve 100 participants. In this session, get step-by-step instructions and learn from the challenges others have already worked through. When you go home, you, too, will be able to organize volunteers, contract with vendors, choose titles, and offer a Book Tasting program to your patrons—in person or online.

Sarah Morrison, Librarian 2, North Olympic Library System

Wednesday, October 7 | 3:30–4:45 | After School Sessions

After School Sessions are hyper-focused on school librarians and scheduled after they wrap up the school day. School-relevant programs are still scheduled throughout the conference.

K–3 Makerspaces: Building to Grow
Join us for a panel discussion with teacher librarians who launched a K–3 co-teaching model Makerspace program in the 2019-20 school year. You will learn how they brought the joy of Makerspace, technology, design thinking, STEAM concepts, and co-teaching to several pilot schools. Walk away with inspiration and practical ideas for how to jump start your Makerspace program.

Debbie Keith, Teacher Librarian, Tacoma Public Schools
Suzanna Panter, Program Manager School Libraries , Tacoma Public Schools
Britte Taylor, Teacher Librarian, Tacoma Public Schools
Meredith Kaupp, Teacher Librarian, Tacoma Public Schools
Susan Byers, Teacher Librarian, Tacoma Public Schools

Research Without Regurgitation
Have you ever wondered how to have students research without simply “spitting back” the facts in their final product? I will share ideas for shaking up the traditional research project, making it more engaging for students, while still accomplishing the "usual" goals of such projects. Let's have them actually DO something with the information!

Kimberly Rose, Teacher-Librarian, Puyallup School District

Wednesday, October 7 | 7:00–7:45 | WLA After Dark

Hate Groups in the Library: Maintaining a Safe Space While Being Inclusive
How do Intellectual Freedom and Inclusion contradict each other? How does the library uphold its role as a third space? Recently in library world hate groups or exclusionary events have been taking up space in the library and have brought many conflicting conversations to the forefront of our jobs. Discussion about the gray area between unbiased service and a commitment to diversity and inclusion is more important than ever.

Nic A Figley, Incoming Chair of CAYAS, King County Library System

Board After Dark: The Gaming Library
This night-track session will provide attendees a casual approach to learning about games and activities they might run in their libraries. A number of board, story, and other games will be available in a variety of genres. Get some hands-on experience playing, ask questions about collection development and events, or share your own experiences.

Ahniwa Ferrari, Associate Dean of Library Operations, The Evergreen State College


Thursday, October 8 | 10:45–12:00 | Sessions I

Connecting Libraries with Local Children's Book Authors & Illustrators
Enjoy fast and furious presentations (think speed dating meets TED Talks) from local children’s book authors and illustrators about their books, then mingle with the presenters during an informal meet-and-greet and signing. Find new books for your libraries, hear secret stories-behind-the-stories to spice up your book talks, check out presenters for potential school visits, gather new ideas for activities, get your questions answered, and pick up some swag. Presented by the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators of Western Washington (SCBWI-WWA) and SCBWI-INW.

Ellie Petersen, illustrator, Bea’s Bees
Maureen McQuerry, author, Big Ideas for Little Philosophers: Socrates, Aristotle, DeBeauvoir and Descartes
Eric Ode, author, Dan, the Taxi Man
Jennifer Mann, author & illustrator, The Camping Trip
Laurie Thompson, author, Two Truths and a Lie: Forces of Nature
Vikram Madan, author & illustrator, A Hatful of Dragons: And More Than 13.8 Billion Other Funny Poems
Dori Butler, author, The Haunted Library
Annette Bay Pimentel, author, All the Way to the Top: How One Girl's Fight for Americans with Disabilities Changed Everything

Open Pedagogy: Individual Voice in All Libraries [10:45–11:30]
All libraries have the potential to not only allow individuals in, but also to seek out the voices of their community. In this session, we will discuss the benefits of open pedagogy and practical ways to support the voice of individual patrons and community members. Often open pedagogy is a term used in academics/higher ed to indicate the practice of teaching and engaging with students through conversation, but open pedagogy can support the teaching and learning in any community space. Share your own experiences and questions and role-play a few scenarios to practice. Walk away with talking tips, communication and emotional intelligence tools, and a deeper understanding of the issues, values, and priorities for managing political talk in the library. Join this session to practice intentionality when it comes to your community.

Greg Bem, Faculty Librarian, Lake Washington Institute of Technology (LWTech)

Narrow Scope, Broad Impact: Washington Special Libraries & You
Most library professionals are familiar with special libraries, but do you know all the different types and what they do? Please join us for a panel of librarians from special libraries around Washington. Hear about what they do and how their collections can help YOUR customers, too.

Judy Pitchford, Central Library Operations Coordinator, Washington State Library
Laura Edmonston, Deputy Law Librarian, Washington State Law Library
Lisa Euster, Librarian, Washington State Department of Ecology
Sara Harrington, Librarian, Eastern State Hospital
Diane Huckaby, WSGS Education & Outreach Chair, Washington State Genealogical Society 
Mary Schaff, Legislative Services Liaison, Washington State Library
Patricia J. Devine, Community Outreach Coordinator, HEALWA Program

Making Voter Registration Accessible Through Voter Points of Assistance
When Washington State launched “Same Day Voter Registration,” Pierce County’s three public library systems saw an opportunity and proposed a partnership with the Elections Office to ensure poverty, transportation, and other barriers do not prevent people from registering and voting on Election Day. Learn how to become a Voter Point of Assistance for your community, and work directly with Elections staff to register new voters and generate ballots to ensure everyone who wants to vote, can.

Georgia Lomax, Executive Director, Pierce County Library System
Kate Larsen, Director, Tacoma Public Library
Kyle Haugh, Election Supervisor, Pierce County Auditor's Office
Megan Dazey, Acting Director, Puyallup Public Library
Meghan Sullivan, Customer Experience Manager, Pierce County Library System

Thursday, October 8 | 1:30–2:15 | Sessions II

Knock-Knock: Using Humor to Open Doors in Middle-Grade Fiction
Although humor is a universal part of human development and communication, humorous books are often overlooked when it comes to issue-driven stories. In this moderated panel, five middle-grade writers show how they use humor as an entry into what are sometimes hard conversations, especially concerning diverse and under-represented populations. Topics include racism and bullying, loss and grief, middle school romance, anxiety, and growing pains. Participants will learn some of the ways these authors work to engage readers, bridge gaps, and make connections. There will be time for a fun (maybe even funny) Q & A session at the end.

Sara Nickerson, Author, Dutton Children's Books
Donna Barba Higuera, Author, Levine Querido, Abrams Kids
Mark Maciejewski, Author, Simon and Schuster
Dan Richards, Author, Little Bee/Yellowjacket
Lily LaMotte, Author, HarperAlley/HarperCollins

Like PB&J: School & Public Librarians Unite
Public and school libraries are the heart of our communities. How do we align our goals and partner to provide safe, welcoming environments for all patrons while accessing information in a variety of formats? Librarians will leave with potential areas of partnership, ideas for sustained projects, identified spheres of overlap, and strengthened services and opportunities through a greater library ecosystem. We recommend attending with your public or school librarian colleagues to forge pathways to address library needs in equitable ways. Just like the staple snack of PB&J, the school and public library combination is power packed!

Kristy Gale, Teen Services Librarian, Seattle Public Library
TuesD Chambers, Teacher Librarian, Seattle Public Schools, Ballard High School
Shannon Wallace, Teen Services Librarian, Seattle Public Library
Darcy Brixey, Library Instructional Materials Program Services Manager, Seattle Public Schools

Collaboration for Community Health
How can libraries develop partnerships to promote health and wellness in communities? We offer examples of programs using two different models of community partnerships. While both models were designed around programs is physical spaces, they have been adapted recently to address community needs in an online environment. “Pediatric Q&A” brought health professionals into the library for programs promoting health knowledge and to provide information about seeking health care; a series of film screenings and panel discussions arose from community-wide concerns about teen mental health and a desire to reduce stigma around talking about it. In addition to sharing our pivots to the online environment, we share strategies for collaboration with health professionals and stakeholders, offer tips about organizing events with partners, and facilitate a discussion about the challenges we experienced while organizing and presenting these programs.  

Carrie Bowman, Teen Services Librarian, King County Library System, Mercer Island Library
Hiuchun "Linda" Mauer, Children's Services Librarian, King County Library System, Redmond and Redmond Ridge Libraries

Thursday, October 8 | 2:30–3:00 | Coffee Chats

Special Library Division Unconference
Join your colleagues for this open and unstructured discussion of topics relevant to the important work that special libraries do, and where it’s heading in the future. With a main facilitator helping to guide the process, session content will be decided on and delivered by the attendees. Join us to share your ideas, to participate in the conversation, or simply to absorb peer wisdom!

Judy Pitchford, Special Library Division Chair
Laura Edmonston, Special Library Division Vice Chair/Chair-Elect
Joe Olayvar, Board Director, Special Library Division Rep

LGBTQIA+ Meetup
Connect with other LGBTQIA+ library professionals and advocates for open networking and discussion. 
To prioritize space for groups that are underrepresented in our profession, this meetup is open to those who identify LGBTQIA+

Grants & Funding Opportunities
Learn about funding opportunities for your library..

Thursday, October 8 | 3:45–4:30 | After School Sessions

After School Sessions are hyper-focused on school librarians and scheduled after they wrap up the school day. School-relevant programs are still scheduled throughout the conference.

Rethink Your Delivery: Blended Learning in Libraries K–12
Are you looking to shake things up? We will provide you an action plan to link modern and fresh teaching practices in the library to technology. Have you considered the pace, place, and choice of personalized learning instruction? Are you looking for ways to engage learners with agency at the core? The Digital Learning Librarian Ambassador program (DLLAs) is a grassroots effort by four school librarians to provide students the opportunity to be active agents driving their own growth. We will demonstrate the advantages a blended model has over traditional instruction when technology is used to engage students both inside the classroom and online. And, in the process, we will provide librarians with essential information and practices that will prepare people for the 21st century.

TuesD Chambers, Teacher Librarian, Seattle Public Schools
Debi Fournier, Teacher Librarian, Seattle Public Schools
Kelsey Klug, Teacher Librarian, Seattle Public Schools
Craig Seasholes, Teacher Librarian, Seattle Public Schools

Diversity in Your Library: Beyond Book Selection
We all know that part of our job as school librarians is to create a diverse, inclusive, and relevant collection for our students. However, beyond the advice of buying more books or looking through a "diverse" book list, it's not always clear how you do that. This session will walk you through 5 concrete steps of collection development with a lens of equity, diversity, and inclusion as well as other policies and practices to consider when creating a library for all.

Elizabeth Roberts, Teacher-Librarian, Information Literacy Curriculum Developer, Bellevue School District
Erin Gehrke, Teacher-Librarian, Bellevue School District
Kimberly Johnson, Teacher-Librarian, Bellevue School District


Friday, October 9 | 10:45–12:00 | Sessions I

Washington Children’s Choice Picture Book Award 2021
Each year, more than 130,000 K–3 students in Washington State vote for WLA’s Washington Children’s Choice Picture Book Award (WCCPBA). Using a fast-paced station system, participants will learn about the 20 diverse and engaging books chosen for the 2021 list. Participants will also learn how to leverage these 20 books to support student learning and engagement in their library through self-selected stations. Come get some new ideas, reflect on past successes and participate in discussions with other elementary teacher-librarians.

Dave Sonnen, WCCPBA Committee Chair, Edmonds School District
WCCPBA Committee members
Sponsors: WLA WCCPBA Committee & School Library Division

Zine Collections in Action: Highlighting Local & Marginalized Voices at Your Library
How are different libraries – public, academic, and school – around the state using zines to highlight underrepresented voices in their communities? Zines, self-published magazines created by one person or a group of individuals, can be about any topic under the sun and provide an inexpensive and accessible way for marginalized members of society to make their voices heard. This panel will explore zines in collections as well as scalable programming ideas for making and exhibiting zines. Come learn how to connect your library with different communities through this creative and accessible form.

Abigail Bass, Librarian, Humanities Department, Central Library, Seattle Public Library
Richard Visick, Librarian, Humanities Department, Central Library, Seattle Public Library
Katherine Curtis, Humanities Librarian, Collins Memorial Library, University of Puget Sound
Aggie Burstein, Librarian, Olympia Timberland Library, Timberland Regional Library

Lightning Talks I
Hear six lightning-fast presentations from innovators across the state! Discover strategies and resources for effective allyship and the creation of equitable, safe spaces to welcome diverse staff and patrons. Hear an account of what it’s like to work full-time at a library while pursuing an MLS degree online, including things to consider when choosing a program, what to expect from the online school experience, and tips for balancing work, school, and rest. Get practical tips for applying for research leave, including how to structure your time, create reasonable goals, and pitch your project to your supervisor. Unpack the emerging issues surrounding genetic testing, privacy, and security, and leave with resources to promote genomic health literacy and assist patrons in locating reliable information. Discuss best practices in online information literacy course design and identify different types of online learners.

Diane Froelich, Library Assistant, Timberland Regional Library
Daniel Tate, Adult Services Tech, Longview Public Library
Caitlin Bagley, Instruction Librarian, Gonzaga University
Carolyn Martin , Consumer Health Coordinator, National Network of Libraries of Medicine Pacific Northwest Region (NNLM PNR)
Sabrina Juhl, Music and Instruction Librarian, Central Washington University

What's in a Data Story? Understanding the Basics of Data Storytelling
Discover the the fundamentals of effective storytelling using data collected and visualized by librarians for librarians. Data without a story is just a pile of numbers. Data with an effective story becomes an everlasting narrative that people will remember for a long time and without much effort. In this presentation, we’ll look at the basic structure of data storytelling and review exemplars both good and bad. No prior knowledge of the topic is required.

Nancy Shin, NNLM PNR Research and Data Coordinator, University of Washington - NNLM PNR

Friday, October 9 | 1:30–2:15 | Sessions II

"But I Don't Have Room for a Makerspace!" Community Impact with a Single 3D Printer in a Small Space on a Small Budget
Like many small- to medium-sized public libraries, our library doesn't have room for a dedicated Makerspace. However, in 2018 a single 3D printer was deployed, and uses have ranged from a patron's prototyping of a new strategy game and publishing about it in a gaming magazine, development of a mini printing press used by local artists, replacement parts for appliances, and—of course—tchotkes. The secret to success has been managing access, file submission, policy, and other "invisible" workings. Join us to hear how we're making a little 3D printer in a little space have big impacts in our community!

Tamara Meredith, Director, Jefferson County Rural Library District
Daniel Heaton, Systems and Technical Services Manager, Jefferson County Rural Library District

Superheroes in the Library
How can comic books be used to teach information literacy skills, increase student engagement, and critical thinking skills, as well as build campus partnerships? Hear from a community college librarian and an English professor about how they collaborate to bring superheroes into the library and classroom.

Linda Keys, Librarian, Spokane Community College
Denise Stripes, English Faculty, Spokane Community College

Hate Groups in the Library: Maintaining a Safe Space While Being Inclusive
How do Intellectual Freedom and Inclusion contradict each other? How does the library uphold its role as a third space? Recently in library world hate groups or exclusionary events have been taking up space in the library and have brought many conflicting conversations to the forefront of our jobs. Discussion about the gray area between unbiased service and a commitment to diversity and inclusion is more important than ever.

Nic A Figley, Incoming Chair of CAYAS, King County Library System

Effective Legislative Engagement
Join WLA's leaders and lobbyist Carolyn Logue as we share WLA’s approach to working with our legislators, and the best ways for you to engage and help before, during, and after the legislative session.

Carolyn Logue, WLA Lobbyist
Rhonda Gould, Executive Director, Walla Walla County Rural Library District, WLA Legislative Committee Co-Chair
Emily Keller, WLA Board President, University of Washington Libraries
Danielle Miller, WLA Board Vice President/President-Elect, Washington Talking Book & Braille Library

Friday, October 9 | 3:45–4:30 | After School Sessions

After School Sessions are hyper-focused on school librarians and scheduled after they wrap up the school day. School-relevant programs are still scheduled throughout the conference.

The Transactional Value of Today's Nonfiction for Children
The expanding variety of children’s nonfiction today embraces children of all ages, reading levels, and cultural backgrounds. Publishers are turning out well-crafted nonfiction on fascinating topics with strong visual design that invite readers to interact beyond the book, share ideas with others, and take action. This panel discussion and interactive workshop—featuring publishers, award-winning authors, and a school librarian —will offer participants new ways to think transactionally about nonfiction books for children and tools for communicating and sharing information that engages readers and inspires further action.

Clare Hodgson Meeker, Author, Growing Up Gorilla
Craig Seasholes, Teacher-Librarian, Dearborn Park Elementary, Seattle Public Schools
Laurie Thompson, Author, Two Truths and a Lie: Forces of Nature
Philip Lee, Author and Publisher, Readerstoeaters.com
JuneJo Lee, Food Ethnographer and Author, Readerstoeaters.com

Escape the Ordinary
Have you wondered about escape rooms and how you can bring the fun and problem-solving of those experiences into your library? Let us introduce you to the school and library versions of an escape room! This session will give you the how-to’s for starting your own escape room program, including lesson plan ideas, best practices, and resources to take away. This session includes tips for school classrooms, school libraries, and public libraries!

Kimberly Rose, Teacher-Librarian, Puyallup School District
Lisa Bain, Teacher-Librarian, Oak Harbor School District


Saturday, October 10 | 11:15–12:30 | Sessions I

Sasquatch & OTTER Award Nominees for 2021
Committee members for the WLA Sasquatch and OTTER Book Awards will present the nominees for 2021. Discover 18 wonderful chapter books for grades K–6, and hear how librarians in schools and public libraries around the state can use the lists to promote reading, inform purchasing, and engage their community

Monica Hodges, Librarian, Jefferson Elementary, Mount Vernon School District
Beth Bermani, Librarian, Mount Vernon City Library
Sponsors: Sasquatch & OTTER Book Award Committees & WLA School Library Division

STEAM Lab: Hands-on Activities to Recreate in Your Library
Learn how to add STEAM programming to your library with no-tech, low-tech, and high-tech programming ideas. This hands-on workshop will teach you how your library can be successful offering STEAM programs for all ages including hands-on activities with coding, robotics, virtual reality (VR), Strawbees, LittleBits, and much, much more. Come talk to library staff with successful STEAM programs from around Washington, while you learn, participate, and see their program ideas in action. Librarians from around the state of Washington have formed a committee to help Washington librarians successfully introduce STEAM programming into their libraries. In addition to programming ideas, we will talk about how to introduce new items into your collections that give patrons the ability to explore the world around them and bridge the digital divide. Having trouble acquiring funding for programs? Find out how to develop partnerships and find available funding to make your STEAM programming dreams a reality.

Siri Hiltz, Youth Services Consultant, Washington State Library
Joe Olayvar, Information Technology Consultant, Washington State Library
Panelists TBD, Washington State Library STEAM Advisory Group

Lightning Talks II [11:15–12:00]
Hear three lightning-fast presentations from innovators across the state! Learn about ACDC: a mnemonic tool to create diverse and compelling displays in your library. Discover Spoilers: a free, quick, one-on-one bluffing game for tweens aged 8-12 based on books they choose, and learn how to adapt it to an online format. Finally, learn about pronouns and practice using them so they no longer sound or feel awkward when found in our workplaces. Finally, forgive the shameless promotion and let a representative from WLA convince you to get involved.

Muriel Wheatley, Operations Manager, Timberland Regional Library, Centralia branch
Kendra Wight, Librarian (Outreach, Children's Services), Sno-Isle Libraries
Mie-Mie Wu, Children's Librarian, King County Library System
Alex Byrne, Youth Services Librarian, Pierce County Library System

Turning Commitment into Action: Supporting an Inclusive Campus Community
Academic libraries contribute to their institutions' mission of creating inclusive communities by promoting accessibility for diverse populations of students. At one university, librarians utilize library resources and services to promote campus diversity and inclusion efforts and build collaborative partnerships outside the library. The presenters will share their specific experiences creating an Asian American and Pacific islander (AAPI) Month Celebration in collaboration with multiple units across the university. AAPI Month activities have helped fill a significant gap in service to their student body. This presentation will focus on the strength of the partnerships and the diverse range of programming provided by the partnerships.

Qing Stellwagen, Diversity & Inclusion Librarian/Assistant Professor, Eastern Washington University
Steven Bingo, Digital Projects Archivist, Eastern Washington University

Saturday, October 10 | 1:30–2:15 | Sessions II

Embracing the Reading Lives of Our Students: Collaborative Student-Centered Teaching Partnerships 
If you’ve ever been frustrated by the phrase “that book is not at your level” or “this month MY students need to read historical fiction,” please join us to learn about and plan for positive, student-centered teaching partnerships and how they can promote, support, and celebrate the independent reading lives of all OUR students. A teacher librarian and a language arts teacher will share how their partnership has evolved over the last three years and how, together, they have begun to shed the dead weight that our readers carry – reading logs, levels, and teacher-driven book selection. We will share our journey and provide resources for anyone who may want to learn more about building a student-centered reading culture. This session will offer blended learning station rotations that will allow attendees to self-select activities and content based upon where you are in your collaborative journey.

Rebecca Wynkoop, Teacher Librarian, Robert Eagle Staff Middle School
Amanda Roenicke, Language Arts Teacher, Department Head, Robert Eagle Staff Middle School

Creating Clear & Proactive Harassment Training for Your Library
Most instances of harassment in the workplace go unreported due to a fear of retaliation or not being believed. Instead of looking at different ways to report harassment, we’ve taken a proactive approach by creating a culture of trust and empathy where staff feel supported to take action and to report inappropriate behaviors from staff, customers, or anyone they encounter in the workplace. From administration-led policies to front-line training, we will engage you in a discussion on some best practices for YOUR library.

Kylie Bayer-Fertterer, Human Resources Manager, City of McMinnville, OR

Through the Eyes of Xiamen, China: A New Perspective of Library Services
Join public library staff as they discuss what they learned while visiting libraries in the Fujian Province of China as part of a two-week staff exchange program with Xiamen Municipal Library. They will share how Xiamen Libraries serve their patrons. Moreover, they will talk about the impact of the exchange and how their whole perspective of library service was changed in a positive way. Get practical ideas of how to better serve your library patrons with insights gained, including patron-driven experiences, technology-assisted services, preservation of culture, and more. Participants will also understand the process and purpose of this library exchange.

Evan Brengle, Senior Branch Supervisor, Fort Vancouver Regional Libraries
Elizabeth Moss, Senior Public Services Librarian, Fort Vancouver Regional Libraries

Tell Me an Online Story
Do you miss in-person story time? Are you thinking of giving a live online story time a try? Come enjoy an in-depth discussion of best practices, unexpected challenges, and hilarious stories from a group of children's librarians and paraprofessionals who have been navigating the weird and murky waters of holding live library programs on Zoom and other apps and platforms. Q&A time provided at the end.

Hope Yeats, Children's Services Librarian, King County Library System
Shanyn Gamble, Public Services Assistant, King County Library System
Jamie Gilmore, Outreach Librarian, Tacoma Public Library
Brian Leu, Children's Services Librarian, Tacoma Public Library

Creating Clear & Proactive Harassment Training for Your Library
Most instances of harassment in the workplace go unreported due to a fear of retaliation or not being believed. Instead of looking at different ways to report harassment, your library can take a proactive approach by creating a culture of trust and empathy where staff feel supported to take action and to report inappropriate behaviors from staff, customers, or anyone they encounter in the workplace. From administration-led policies to front-line training, we will engage you in a discussion on some best practices for YOUR library.

Kylie Bayer-Fertterer, Human Resources Manager, City of McMinnville, OR

Saturday, October 10 | 7:00–7:45 | WLA After Dark

Book Club: An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States, For Young People
Join WLA’s Social Responsibilities Round Table (SRRT) for a book club discussion around An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States, For Young People. This popular book from 2019 has become an essential resource for understanding our Native communities in Washington and encourages all of us to think critically about our place in history. Please come with a basic knowledge of the book, ready to share and listen!

Samantha Hines, SRRT Chair, Peninsula College Library
Alexa Andrews, SRRT Vice Chair, Whatcom County Library System 
Angelina Kuchar, SRRT member, Whatcom County Library System
Sponsor: WLA Social Responsibilities Round Table (SRRT)

Library Horror Stories
From spirits lurking in the stacks to terrible things left in books, hear the spookiest library horror stories in this open mic. Listen to your peers or share your own chilling tales!

Darcy Brixey, Manager, Library Services & Instructional Materials, Seattle Public Schools

Staying Non-Partisan Doesn't Mean Staying Quiet
As our national political conversation becomes increasingly divided, it's easy to want to avoid politics altogether, but talking about laws, politicians, and our political process is a vital part of a thriving and thinking democracy. Libraries can support political inquiry and civil discourse by reaching into our traditional skill sets of inquiry, listening, and authoritative research. Yet there are times when toxic, political talk goes too far and threatens to make our libraries unsafe for some of our patrons. Librarians must be the firm voices that keep our spaces safe and welcoming to all people, balancing freedom of expression with inclusion. This session will be a chance to learn and share the skills, attitudes, and phrasings that will make libraries islands of democratic, civil discussion as Election Day 2020 approaches.

Erin Suda, Public Services Assistant, Whatcom County Library System, Deming branch
Dianne Marrs-Smith, Public Services Branch Manager, Whatcom County Library System, Lynden branch

Flight School: Engineering Paper & Balsa Wood Airplanes
Turn folding a simple paper airplane into a STEAM lesson in computational thinking. You’ll learn hands on the design process used to modify a simple airplane, through four flyable stages, into a one-of-a-kind jet. Each stage presents its own characteristics for learning the basics of aerodynamics and flight. To follow along with accurate folding during the session, grab a pair of scissors, some tape, and a steno pad that tears cleanly from the top. In addition, I will talk about a few simple balsa wood creations, including the world’s coolest rubber band-launched jet with working ailerons and elevators. Using these fun, creative principles…the sky’s the limit for your own Flight School.

Joe Olayvar, IT Consultant, Washington State Library

Sr. Branch Supervisor

Effective Legislative Engagement